Announcements

Top Tip to Learn More!

Posted by haileyrenaud on August 7th, 2020

Are you looking to enhance your learning about the ocean? Are you looking for more opportunities for professional development, volunteer opportunities, or potentially a career option in ocean conservation? I recommend subscribing to organization newsletters, where you will be updated monthly/bi-monthly about ways you can do and learn more!

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SEVENSEAS Media - The Global Marine Community Ocean News and Network

Exploring By The Seat Of Your Pants -  Beaming Science, Exploration, Adventure and Conservation live into Classrooms Around the World


Ocean Depths to Tree Tops - a Virtual Summer Camp!

Posted by haileyrenaud on July 29th, 2020


Via interactive video talks and activities youth will learn about marine and terrestrial ecology, community science and connection to place.

From blobfish and plankton, to bats and berries. Join the Stanley Park Ecology Society and Ocean Wise for a journey from the depths of the ocean to tree tops in a virtual summer camp engaging youth on local habitats and how to get involved to help protect them. We will explore nature around us through art, activities, short presentations, Q&A and more. What challenges do these ecosystems face? How can we use community science to make a difference? Find out on our journey through nature from home!

Join for single days or the whole week! Each day, participants will be given an optional activity to do on their own in the afternoon. There will be an optional session in the afternoon to come back and share what you did, or if you are participating the whole week, you can share in the break-out session the following day.

BOOK TICKETS HERE:  https://www.eventbrite.ca/e/ocean-depths-to-tree-tops-a-virtual-summer-camp-tickets-113019303780?fbclid=IwAR0sGIt1OEkwUOa4VcYHqJ6ZA-aTHgH3N1NHtef_6YHpYdWI9Lrb7bXfKfg

Ages: 11-15

Platform: Zoom

Dates: August 17-21, 2020

Daily Schedule:

9:30 -11:30 am -
Welcome, Group Sharing, short solo activity, learning sessions from SPES and Ocean Wise, and an introduction into an optional activity to do in the afternoon!

11:30 am - 12:00 pm -
Optional Q&A session

12:00 - 2:15 pm -
Lunch and optional activity time

2:15 pm -
Optional sharing session for single day participants


Daily Descriptions:

Day 1 – Sea to Sky

On day one, we will explore the different spaces that plants and animals inhabit from sea to sky. First, we will swim through the different ocean zones, focusing on creatures of the deep sea and the adaptations that help them survive the challenges of ocean depths. As we reach the shoreline and step onto the land, we will discover the places that life is found, focusing on the only mammals to truly fly through our planet’s skies – bats!

Day 2 – Hidden Worlds

Dive into the ocean to explore the diversity of plankton and how these microscopic organisms support life in the ocean. As our journey continues, swim upstream to find out about tiny freshwater creatures hidden just beneath the water’s surface – freshwater macroinvertebrates. You will also learn how both ecosystems are impacted by pollution and microplastics.

Day 3 – Apex Predators

Today we’re getting close to nature’s large and in charge animals – apex predators! On land we will look up to the skies at bald eagles, the amazing predators of land, water, and tree tops. After, we will take a dip in the ocean to swim alongside sharks, the mysterious predators of the ocean. Find how you can help these animals find food just by paying attention to what you eat for dinner!

Day 4 – Where Water Meets Land

As we float toward the end of our week together, we will investigate the special spots where water meets land. In the forest, we will explore some of the plants and animals that rely on riparian zones, the areas where streams and rivers meet the land. Then, we will wade into the intertidal zone to learn more about this world that changes by the hour. These habitats are not only important to the organisms that live there, but can be crucial for overall ecosystem health, and are under many threats from human activities.

Day 5 – Helping Our Habitats

On our final day, we will reflect on the challenges that our world’s habitats are facing and the stresses that we put on natural ecosystems, like introduced species and climate change. In the ocean, we will explore the benefits eelgrass habitats provide and how we can protect it. Then, we will hop back on land to learn about the importance of native species in maintaining local biodiversity, and how you can help scientists by recording what you see with an app.


#DrawYourDecade - Youth Help Needed!

Posted by Danika on July 22nd, 2020


In an effort to increase your understanding about the UN Decade of Ocean Science for Sustainable Development (2021-2030) and encourage your direct involvement in the implementation of the UN Decade, you are invited to participate in the #DrawYourDecade campaign.

#DrawYourDecade is a youth outreach and engagement activity designed to educate and involve young people in the United Nations Decade of Ocean Science for Sustainable Development (Decade). The goal of this campaign is to draw out young people’s collective priorities for the next ten years of the ocean. Ultimately, these priorities will be incorporated into the planning and implementation of the UN Decade of Ocean Science for Sustainable Development - what you draw here could have direct implications for how the Decade is executed!

Specifically, #DrawYourDecade aims to draw out your priorities related to the seven goals of the Ocean Decade: (1) a clean ocean; (2) a healthy and resilient ocean; (3) a productive ocean; (4) a predicted ocean; (5) a safe ocean; (6) an accessible ocean; and (7) an inspiring and engaging ocean.

Using whatever creative means available (paper and pencil, collages, computer graphics, etc.), you will create an image of your priorities for the ocean over the period of the Decade, answering the question, “what do you want the ocean to look like in ten years?”. Your artistic abilities don’t matter! It’s about demonstrating your interests and passions about the ocean.

In addition to your illustration, you’ll need to write two short summaries (3-4 sentences) of your illustration: the first using whatever language you choose, and the second using only the 1,000 most common words in the American English language (as found in The Up-Goer Five library).

By following the step-by-step instructions below, you’ll learn more about these seven overarching goals and be able to contribute to a discussion about creating the ocean we need, for the future we want through the #DrawYourDecade campaign.

Full instructions HERE

Share your artwork in the gallery

Submit your artwork in the Google Form


Welcome to the Youth Leadership Community!

Posted by brettvo on June 22nd, 2020

At Ocean Wise, our mission is to inspire the global community to become Ocean Wise by increasing its understanding, wonder and appreciation for our oceans. Our Children & Youth Programs are immersive ocean education experiences that foster love for our oceans through fun and interactive activities, engaging over 9,000 children, youth and families in marine science annually.

Our youth programs and initiatives create space for the next generation of environmental leaders to be supported and inspired.

YouthToSea:  YouthToSea is designed to give a voice to youth in discussions about ocean conservation and sustainability. Our members will  develop their own ideas to become part of a larger group of environmental leaders.  Youth will gain valuable work experience, service hours and mentorship in leadership and education through a work placement with our AquaCamps program at the Vancouver Aquarium.  Training includes several certifications and a weekend retreat with team-building and leadership programs. Our goal is to create a space where youth can connect and support each other as they take action in their own communities to drive ocean conservation efforts. Participants will have the opportunity to develop service projects to be part of a youth-driven effort to inspire the next generation of global leaders, and engage the public in ocean conservation efforts

Learning Journeys: Learning Journey's are multi-day excursions that allow youth the opportunity to encounter new experiences and challenges that furthers their personal and professional development. On our Learning Journey's participants work together as a diverse team across Greater Vancouver to increase their knowledge on the Ocean Literacy Principles. Our hope is that we help develop and foster a love and understanding for our outdoor environment. Learning Journey participants become ambassadors and champions for ocean conservation, global citizenship and a collaborative, hopeful future.  By starting with awe and wonder, then enhancing learning with in-depth multi-media content, we inspire our participants to take action for ocean conservation. 

Duke of Edinburgh's International Award: Ocean Wise is proud to partner with the Duke of Edinburgh's International Award, giving youth the opportunity to complete their award under the mentorship of Ocean Wise staff.  The Duke Edinburgh’s International Award is an internationally recognized program for young people, building their skills to equip them for life and work. 


 

Online Ocean: If you are looking for unique ways to engage and learn about the ocean - look no further. Educators and animal experts at Ocean Wise and Vancouver Aquarium have compiled fun activities and educational resources to teach kids to learn and care for the ocean from the comfort of your living room. From crafts to live-stream programsOnline Ocean has it all. Content will be updated regularly. Check back often.






Questions about our programs? Please email [email protected] or call 604-659-3493

Want to stay in the loop? Register to our page to get the latest updates! 


This World Oceans Day, let’s rally to build a new, blue, future after COVID-19

Posted by haileyrenaud on June 8th, 2020

World Oceans Day
June 8, 2020
Lasse Gustavsson
President and CEO, Ocean Wise


We used to think of the ocean as an expansive, unknowable, never-ending source of food and resources. Now we know better. The combined pressures of pollution, unsustainable resource extraction and climate change are pushing our ocean to the brink.


Humans need to understand that the world, as we know it, will not survive without a healthy and flourishing ocean. For starters, the ocean is our planet’s most effective line of defense against climate change.

LASSE GUSTAVSSON, PRESIDENT & CEO, OCEAN WISE

Humans need to understand that the world, as we know it, will not survive without a healthy and flourishing ocean. For starters, the ocean is our planet’s most effective line of defense against climate change. The ocean sequesters carbon more efficiently than forests and produces 70% of the oxygen we breathe. It is also the key source of protein for 3.1 billion people and provides livelihood to 10% of the earth’s population[. Furthermore, the ocean is home to hundreds of thousands of wonderous aquatic species, many not even discovered yet. These ocean species are not only innocent victims in humankind’s mistreatment of the ocean, but some of them may be the key to future scientific discoveries.

As we enter the relief phase of COVID-19, and governments around the world plan investments to restart their economies, we are at a very unique crossroads: do we simply build back the economy as it was? Or, we can build it back better, prioritizing low carbon industries and environmental protection. Can we take advantage of this moment in history when governments are making massive investments in business and industry to ‘leapfrog’ to clean-energy technologies and new ways of doing things.

Is leapfrogging really possible? Of course it is. I am from Sweden and in the 1980s, I can recall how several of the former soviet bloc countries, including East Germany, Poland and Hungary, were in dire need of significant upgrades to telephone systems. But instead of investing in copper wiring and traditional technology, these countries constructed cutting-edge 3G cellular networks, putting them among the most advanced communication systems in Europe at the time. They leapfrogged outdated thinking and jumped straight to the most advanced technology available. We can do this too.

There has been a lot of talk about investing in the ‘green economy’ post COVID-19. Well, I am here to argue that we should also be investing in the ‘blue economy.’

“The Blue Economy is the sustainable use of ocean resources for economic growth, improved livelihoods and jobs, and ocean ecosystem health.” (World Bank)

Globally, the blue economy, including tourism, fisheries, marine renewable energy and biotechnology, is predicted to grow at double the rate of the rest of the economy by 2030.

Investing in the blue economy means managing the ocean in a way that it remains healthy, and can continue to benefit people as a source of food, carbon sink, recreation and employment.

Globally, investments need to be made in sustainable fisheries, sustainable aquaculture, sustainable energy production, sustainable shipping (including investments in low carbon fuel and green ports), ecosystem protection and carbon sequestration.

The innovation and ideas are there, our governments just need to be courageous enough to implement them.


Eelgrass meadows (such as the one pictured above) have shown an impressive ability to store and sequester carbon. Ocean Wise advocates for mapping, tracking, and re-colonizing these underwater meadows as one of many ways to address climate change through investments in the ‘blue economy’.



Stuck at home? 'Online Oceans' launches just in time to save you (and help the ocean)!

Posted by haileyrenaud on April 2nd, 2020

To help parents manage the new reality of weeks at home with the kids, Ocean Wise Conservation Association has launched a free online ocean literacy resource called Online Oceans, bringing ocean-inspired crafts, activities, DIY videos, livestreamed learning, and more, to families around the world.

Created by Ocean Wise educators, together with animal experts from the Vancouver Aquarium, these captivating resources are designed for kids and youth of all ages to learn the how and why of caring for the ocean, and all the animals in it.

With activities and offerings broken down by age group, a highlight of Online Oceans is the livestreamed learning sessions on topics including: Ocean Plastics, Sharks! and Arctic Adaptations. Livestreams take place multiple times each week and are free to join from the comfort of your own laptop.

Looking for something even more personal and engaging for your family? Why not sign up for a Virtual AquaClass? These personalized sessions allow your kids to meet online with an Ocean Wise educator to dive deeper into learning topics like “Careers in Conservation” or “Reptiles and Amphibians”. Normally reserved for schools – this program is being opened to individual families during school closures. Virtual AquaClasses cost $45 for a 45-minute session, and multiple families can split the cost to take part in a single session, each from their own home computer.

Teachers are also welcome to make use of Online Oceans, too, and will find that many of the resources are curriculum based and perfect to incorporate into their distance education offerings.

Highlights from Online Oceans:

*Content is updated regularly, so check back often.

Want more? Check out our resources tab where we are uploading new activitiesanimal facts, and arts & crafts daily!

Follow @OceanWiseEdu on Twitter for more updates!


Salish Sea Science Program 2020: Apply Today!

Posted by haileyrenaud on February 4th, 2020

Are you a passionate youth committed to the conservation of aquatic life? If so, we have an opportunity for you to join us on Hornby Island at the Tribune Bay Outdoor Education Centre for the 3-day/2-night Salish Sea Science Program!

Participating youth (30) will learn about the seven ocean literacy principles, the history of the area and traditional knowledge through outdoor activities. Students will then work in teams to develop an online learning resource to be uploaded to Ocean Wise’s online learning environment. The resources will be a reflection of their experience at the Salish Sea program, and will provide teachers with a tool to guide their class through the fundamentals of ocean literacy. To fully engage youth in ocean leadership, participants will challenge themselves in a ropes course, explore the coast in kayaks (weather permitting) and discover intertidal creatures while tide pooling. 

Program details:

Date: April 24th - 26th 2020

Age: Grade 10 – 12

Cost: $50.00

Drop-off & Pick-up location:  Horseshoe Bay Ferry Terminal OR Departure Bay Ferry Terminal (TBA)

Our 2020 program will run April 24th to 26th. Applications are open, and will close March 15th. If you have any questions, please email [email protected] for more information.


The Ocean Literacy and Leadership Camp registration is now open!

Posted by haileyrenaud on January 15th, 2020

The Ocean Literacy and Leadership Camp registration is now open. The camp will be located at Tribune Bay Outdoor Education Centre on beautiful Hornby IslandFor more information about the camp see here.

Ocean Literacy & Leadership online course and in-person camp will explore our personal leadership strengths which we can apply to being advocates for our ocean.  In order to fully understand the ocean, we will be diving into the 7 Ocean Literacy Principles which help us understand the ocean’s influence on you—and your influence on the Ocean.  There will be opportunities to explore the wonders of the ocean and to self reflect on the personal choice’s you make in your life and how it directly effects the health of the ocean. The leadership component will have a solutions-based focus and will help prepare you for the final culminating Action Project to take back to your school and/or community.

By the end of this course you will be able to:

  • Identify your personal leadership traits and strength;
  • Understand the importance of a multi-perspective approach to communicating;
  • Understand the Essential Principles and Fundamental Concepts about the ocean;
  • Have deeper connections to marine species and the concept of interconnectedness;
  • Make informed and responsible decisions regarding the ocean and advocating for its health;
  • Have tools and a plan to execute an action project.

Register now!


Help Protect Our Oceans, Turn the Tide with Ocean Wise

Posted by haileyrenaud on December 11th, 2019

The ocean is our planet’s life support system. It is the provider of food, recreation, transport and even the oxygen we breathe – and to lose this is too big a cost. Join us in protecting our oceans: http://support.ocean.org/turnthetide


Out in the water, down in the blue

Where the waves meet the shore, where the boats fish for food,

Where the seals have their play time, and where the fish learn to fly.

This is your ocean, and it's starting to die

The waters are bloated, afloat on each tide,

The bottles that don't hold a message inside.

Once full of dreams of an old pirates chest, 

now full of treasure, that never digests.

Who will protect it, the creatures defend? 

Be a port in the storm, an ally, a friend.

Discover it's secrets. Rescue the lost, 

And remind us to lose this is too big a cost

Show them the creatures, tell all the tales, 

From the tiniest plankton to the mightiest whale.

This is your ocean. This is the blue.

Listen, can you hear it? It's calling to you.


2020 Ocean Awareness Contest

Posted by michellebien on December 2nd, 2019

Bow Seat Ocean Awareness Program has opened it's contest for 2020! Youth (11-18) from around the world are invited to participate by creating their own work that explores hope in action. Submissions are accepted in visual art, film, music, poetry, prose, and interactive & multimedia! More information about the contest can be found here. Full contest rules/submission requirements here.

Interested in creating something but need resources/help? Check out our YouthToSea Program - this team including passionate students from BC and Ocean Wise Staff can help you create an ocean awareness art project!


Green Gift Guide

Posted by michellebien on November 26th, 2019

Check out the YouthToSea Green Gift Guide! Created by our youth members it includes sustainable gift ideas for the foodie, adventurer, eco-warrior, fashionista, or just everyday enviro-conscious friend in your life. It includes information about each product, where you can find it and some DIY gifts and tips on how to make your holiday season more sustainable! 

Full guide can be found here:  http://education.ocean.org/youth/resources/get/214707/Y2S%20gift%20guide%20%282%29.pdf


Ocean Literacy and Leadership Camp 2020

Posted by haileyrenaud on November 22nd, 2019

Are you a young woman between the ages 15 and 18 and are passionate about being a voice for the ocean and learning the leadership skills to put an ocean conservation project into action?

On behalf of Ocean Wise, the Tribune Bay Outdoor Education Centre, School District 71-Comox Valley and Navigate NIDES, we would like to announce that the 3rd annual Ocean Literacy and Leadership Camp will take place this year from July 12-16th 2020!

The Ocean Literacy & Leadership 4 credit-online course and in-person camp will explore our personal leadership strengths which we can apply to being advocates for our ocean. In order to fully understand the ocean, we will be diving into the 7 Ocean Literacy Principles which help us understand the ocean’s influence on you—and your influence on the Ocean. There will be opportunities to explore the wonders of the ocean and to self reflect on the personal choice’s you make in your life and how it directly effects the health of the ocean. The leadership component will have a solutions-based focus and will help prepare you for the final culminating Action Project to take back to your school and/or community. By collaborating with young women around the province, challenging your physical abilities, and gaining motivation through mentors in the field, you will come away feeling supported and reflect how we are part of a greater community working towards positive change.

By the end of this course you will be able to:

· Identify your personal leadership traits and strength;

· Understand the importance of a multi-perspective approach to communicating;

· Understand the Essential Principles and Fundamental Concepts about the ocean;

· Have deeper connections to marine species and the concept of interconnectedness;

· Make informed and responsible decisions regarding the ocean and advocating for its health;

· Have tools and a plan to execute an action project.

Registration will open on January 15th, 2020. Please see more information about the camp here, and register for the email waitlist to be notified as soon as registration is live!



How phat is that pinniped?

Posted by haileyrenaud on November 12th, 2019

How phat is that pinniped?

"I was originally going to call this update “Microwaving seal pups” but that sounded too much like the work of a mad scientist. But I bet you’re intrigued now …

Here’s the real story: One of the most important health measurements of almost any marine mammal is the amount of fat that it has. For most marine mammals this fat is stored in its subcutaneous blubber layer which not only helps keep them warm, but also serves as a critical energy reserve for certain times of the year when food may be scarce or energy expenses high. How much fat animals possess can tell scientists a lot about their overall health, such as whether they are suffering from malnutrition or disease. This is vital information for understanding why some populations of marine mammals are declining in the wild.

The problem that field researchers have long faced is finding a good method for measuring “fatness”. One way is to use various external body measurements to see if they are larger than expected (think: “is their waist large for their height?”) but these tend to be very imprecise. You can also take ultrasound images of the actual blubber layer, but it’s very tricky determining where it’s best to measure this. More recently, scientists have used injections of a labelled water, deuterium oxide, to more precisely determine how much fat the animals possess. Unfortunately, this requires holding the animal for several hours and taking a series of blood samples, which is logistically challenging in wild animals. It can also get very expensive when dealing with large marine mammals. What is needed is a rapid, inexpensive method that can be used in field work.

Enter salmon and the bathroom scale to the rescue. Muscle contains more water than fat, and water is very good at conducting electrical signals. The more fat you have, the more difficulty (“resistance”) a signal will have travelling through your body. That’s how your fancy bathroom scale works – when you stand on the pads, it actually measures the resistance of your body to a small electrical current, and converts the result into percent fat. Unfortunately, it’s difficult to get most marine mammals to stand on a scale. Fortunately, salmon researchers have been using a similar technology for years. The suitably (but uncreatively) named “FatMeter” is a compact device that sends a harmless, very low-level microwave signal through a fish and can instantly tell you how much fat it has.

Of course, both the FatMeter and your bathroom scale work because the developers know how to translate the electrical signal into percent body fat for specific animals. That means you can’t just use it right away for a seal or whale. So, we are currently evaluating and modifying this technology with both Steller sea lions at the Vancouver Aquarium and seal pups at Marine Mammal Rescue. The sea lions are placed on different diets where they will gain and lose fat. The harbour seal pups are measured as they naturally get fatter before getting released. We take FatMeter measurements at a number of sites along their body, because we don’t yet know what the best site will be or whether we need to measure at more than one (see attached photos). We also take a suite of external body measurements as well as ultrasound blubber images. Finally, we use the traditional deuterium oxide method to estimate the seal’s “true” fat mass. All this data will be put into a mathematical model that will tell us which combination of measurements most accurately and easily predicts the seal or sea lion’s true body condition. The initial results look very promising – we might only need a few FatMeter measurements and 1 or 2 external body measurements to get a good estimate of the “fatness” of an individual seal or sea lion.

This project is one part of our continuing research conservation program. Our goal is to use animals under the Aquarium’s care to directly aid the study and conservation of species in the wild."

Dave Rosen

Collections Research Coordinator


Ocean Wise Walrus Research

Posted by haileyrenaud on October 17th, 2019

"I have been quoted more than once saying that walrus, and not polar bears, should be the poster child for climate change, particularly sea ice loss, in the Arctic (sorry Coke). This is because walrus are the more ice-dependent species (not that polar bears aren't also going to have a tough time of it). Walrus require ice to raise their calves, and to have a stable platform over reliable food resources in order to forage efficiently. When the ice isn't where it is supposed to be, they have to swim farther from their existing ice floes to get to food, which costs more energy (meaning they need even more food). Alternatively, they may be forced to haul out on land, which also costs more energy to reach foraging grounds, and where the threats of disease and trampling dramatically increase.

Photos by: Oceanwide Expedition and KT Miller

One of the central questions that scientists face is trying to figure out how much food a walrus normally needs and how much more it needs if it has to be more active or spend more time in the water. Scientists have produced mathematical models, partly based on food intake of managed walruses. Unfortunately, there are no real data on the energy expenditure of walruses, so scientists have had to base their models on information from other species. But walruses seem pretty different than most other marine mammals.

With the arrival of Balzak and Lakina at the Vancouver Aquarium, we saw an opportunity to fill this critical data gap. Knowing the food requirements of young walrus is particularly important as it has the greatest potential long-term effects on population health. We set up a study to measure how much energy our young walruses use while resting in water, something scientists call resting metabolic rate, which is the very foundation of those mathematical models of total food requirements. The plan was to have the walruses sit quietly underneath a floating dome, and then measure how much oxygen they consume and carbon dioxide they produce. Of course, we faced the question of whether we could get our own rambunctious toddler walruses to sit still long enough (7-10 minutes) for anything, never mind floating in a dome with minimal food reinforcement.

Surprisingly (and as a credit to the training staff) it only took a few months for the walruses to learn this behaviour. We then began a series of measurements every few weeks so that we could track changes as the animals grew and as the seasons changed (which is very important to the food requirements of almost all marine mammals). You may have seen us out in the research pool, but if not there is a short video of one of our early training sessions here: https://youtu.be/JTzDgWCKRyA

It has now been almost a year, and we have found some remarkable things. First, young growing walrus seem to have relatively low energy requirements (for their size!) compared to other marine mammals. This might relate to their relative sedentary lifestyle. Second, Lakina seems to be already showing some changes associated with season, that you usually only see in reproductive females!

The next step is training the walruses to swim underwater laps of the research pool. This is very tricky as they must also learn not to breathe at the surface except in the dome (which is definitely not a natural behaviour). But they are - once again - learning surprisingly fast.

The information we are collecting from our walruses, together with data from a parallel study with older walruses at Oceanografic, will be instrumental in enabling scientists to make better predictions on the effects of changes in sea ice on the health of individual walruses and, ultimately, on how climate change will impact walrus populations in the Arctic."

Dave Rosen
Collections Research Coordinator

Read more:  https://research.ocean.org/project/walruses


Nature Photography Contest

Posted by michellebien on September 18th, 2019

The Nature Conservancy of Canada has released their Photo Contest winners for 2019! Check out the unbelievable photographs here:

https://www.nature.org/en-us/get-involved/how-to-help/photo-contest/2019-winners/?fbclid=IwAR1V05oTpzQVf8cCHWNhN6JyhAB5BXMaHS8TjrMrF44e0I7KBKt7No4VoMw

Inspired by these images? Submit your own photos to the YouthToSea photography contest for your chance to win Aquarium tickets and have your photograph displayed at the Vancouver Aquarium! Submissions are due on September 30th. Find out how to apply and see the contest rules here:  https://vanaqua.tiged.org/youth/assignments/folder/1377


Mountain to Oceans 2019 - Apply Now!

Posted by haileyrenaud on September 13th, 2019


Oct 10-13, 2019

Ages: 16-18

Cost: $200


Join the Ocean Wise Education team as we explore the connection between our watersheds on our second annual Mountain to Oceans program. Begin with a sleepover at the Vancouver Aquarium, a visit to our Research Laboratories, overnight programming at the Cheakamus Centre, and end the adventure with the Squamish Rafting Company.

Applications are due September 16 2019.


YouthToSea

Posted by michellebien on August 28th, 2019

Ocean Wise is proud to announce the launch of our new youth development program, YouthToSea.

 The YouthToSea program was created by a small group of passionate youth in collaboration with Ocean Wise to give youth the opportunity to participate in ocean conservation. YouthToSea aims to unite youth (14-21) with a common interest: to protect and conserve our oceans. Our goal is to create a space where youth can connect and support each other as they take action in their own communities to drive ocean conservation efforts.

YouthToSea will have an active Executive Council who will be responsible for guiding the program, planning large events such as Youth Summits and Workshops, and mentoring our members. With support from the Executive Council and professional advisors, YouthToSea members will develop their own ocean conservation ideas and turn them into action in their communities. We encourage creativity in project design and will support students through a variety of ocean service projects

Members will be responsible for developing an ocean themed project for World Oceans Day 2020, as well as 30 hours of ocean service and outreach throughout the year. YouthToSea will provide access to development workshops, professional advisors, a calendar of volunteer opportunities, an online community for support, and monthly updates with conference, competition, and experiential learning journey opportunities. YouthToSea will provide a variety of resources and workshop opportunities to our youth to help them build employable skills.

If you are interested in joining The YouthToSea program, please fill out our application form here:

https://docs.google.com/forms/d/1EgjvDqzYYCv49EEHYSlHBSg3LO716rV3-7hv59uR8H8/edit

Applications are now open and will close September 30th.

For more information check out the resources on our website or contact [email protected]


Ocean Literacy Leadership Camp 2019

Posted by haileyrenaud on March 15th, 2019


A Unique Outdoor Education and Adventure Experience on Hornby Island Returns!

Following the incredibly successful 2018 inaugural camp, Tribune Bay Outdoor Education Center in partnership with Ocean Wise and Navigate NIDES (Comox Valley Schools - School District 71) are offering another exciting outdoor education experience. 

The Ocean Literacy and Leadership Camp is an educational retreat for young women ages 15 – 18 taking place from July 14 to 19 at Tribune Bay Outdoor Education Centre on beautiful Hornby Island. The all-female, six-day, five-night camp focuses on ocean literacy and ecology to enhance and increase knowledge about marine life and stewardship. Participants will gain a strong understanding of the leading environmental issues affecting our oceans today and be inspired to take part in a global effort to protect our waters.

The 2019 camp will include:

• Hands-on workshops with Deep Bay Marine Field Station

• Potential opportunity to connect with the local MLA and learn about changing government

legislation

• Ocean Literacy training from Ocean Wise

• Interactive leadership training on Hornby Island to emphasize online course work

As a special feature, this year’s camp will include a focus on inspiration. Several guest speakers with a variety of skills, experience, education, and background will be sharing their message of encouragement and how to face leadership challenges no matter what the issue or cause. Internationally acclaimed inspirational speaker Talli Osborne, known for her spunk and vitality, will deliver the keynote address and spend a portion of the week interacting with participants. 

The Ocean Literacy and Leadership Camp runs from July 14 to 19 at the Tribune Bay Outdoor Education Centre on Hornby Island. A mandatory pre-camp online course commences April 1st. Participants who successfully complete the online course and camp program will earn four course credits, toward their BC Graduation Certificate. 

Cost for the camp is $630 pp. All meals, accommodation and program material are provided. Transportation is available from Vancouver Island, from the Powell River Ferry terminal in Little River and from the Departure Bay ferries terminal in Nanaimo.

The camp is open to a maximum of 40 participants. For more information and to register, visit http://tribunebayoutdoored.ca/...


Salish Sea Science Program 2019: Apply Today!

Posted by haileyrenaud on February 20th, 2019

Are you a passionate youth committed to the conservation of aquatic life? If so, we have an opportunity for you to join us on Hornby Island at the Tribune Bay Outdoor Education Centre for the 3-day/2-night Salish Sea Science Program!

Participating youth (30) will learn about the seven ocean literacy principles, the history of the area and traditional knowledge through outdoor activities. Students will then work in teams to develop an online learning resource to be uploaded to Ocean Wise’s online learning environment. The resources will be a reflection of their experience at the Salish Sea program, and will provide teachers with a tool to guide their class through the fundamentals of ocean literacy. To fully engage youth in ocean leadership, participants will challenge themselves in a ropes course, explore the coast in kayaks (weather permitting) and discover intertidal creatures while tide pooling. 

Program details:

Date: April 26th - 28th 2019

Age: Grade 10 – 12

Cost: $50.00

Drop-off & Pick-up location:  Horseshoe Bay Ferry Terminal OR Departure Bay Ferry Terminal

How to apply:

Please complete the Application Form and email your responses to [email protected] before March 15th 2019. All applicants will be notified as to whether they are accepted or not by March 29th.


Calling All Educators - Bring the 2019 Weddell Sea Expedition to Your Virtual Classroom!

Posted by haileyrenaud on January 29th, 2019

Join the Weddell Sea Expedition! This pioneering Antarctic expedition has been underway since the beginning of January and sending us updates all the way from the Weddell Sea in Antarctica. Visit the Weddell Sea Expedition’s Journey Page to explore what we have learned so far and see video conferences with members of the expedition team and crew. If this sparks your interest, find out more at explore.reachtheworld.org and email [email protected] to sign up to virtually join over 200 classrooms across the world who are participating in this exciting expedition!


10 Ways to Be a Great Youth Leader

Posted by haileyrenaud on December 27th, 2018

1.  Have a plan, but remain flexible.

2.  Model behavior.

3.  Empower others.

4.  Get organized.

5.  Wear a thick skin.


6.  View learning as a two-way street.

7.  Be ready for anything. 

8.  Remember: it’s not all about you!

9.  Ask for help.

10.  Have a Plan B… or Z

Source: https://www.signupgenius.com/g...


The youth is the hope of our future.

Posted by haileyrenaud on November 27th, 2018


Salish Sea Science Program Recruitment: Apply Now!

Posted by haileyrenaud on September 27th, 2018

Are you a passionate youth committed to the conservation of aquatic life? If so, we have an opportunity for you to join us on Hornby Island at the Tribune Bay Outdoor Education Centre for the 3-day/2-night Salish Sea Science Program!

Participating youth (20-30) will learn about the seven ocean literacy principles, the history of the area and traditional knowledge through outdoor activities. Students will then work in teams to develop an online learning resource to be uploaded to Ocean Wise’s online learning environment. The resources will be a reflection of their experience at the Salish Sea program, and will provide teachers with a tool to guide their class through the fundamentals of ocean literacy. To fully engage youth in ocean leadership, participants will challenge themselves in a ropes course, explore the coast in kayaks (weather permitting) and discover intertidal creatures while tide pooling. 

Submit a short (no longer than 1 page) letter of interest to [email protected] by October 5th to be considered for the program. All successful applicants will be notified before October 10th.

All questions can be directed to Hailey at 604-659-3493/236-886-4191 or [email protected] 

Sea you soon!

Hailey


Mountain to Oceans Recruitment: Apply Now!

Posted by haileyrenaud on September 11th, 2018

We are recruiting 25-30 youth between the ages of 16-18 for our Mountain to Oceans program running October 4-7 2018. Join us on an outdoor adventure to witness first hand the connection between mountains and oceans, and how these play a crucial role in the landscape, life cycles, and traditions of the Squamish Watershed.

Submit your application before September 21st to be considered for this program. All questions can be directed to Hailey at [email protected] or 604-659-3493.

See you soon!


Young Women in Ocean Literacy and Leadership Camp 2018

Posted by haileyrenaud on July 18th, 2018

This week, we have recruited 46 young women from across BC to partake in the first ever Ocean Literacy and Leadership Camp at the Tribune Bay Outdoor Education Center. We have spent our time breaking down the ocean literacy principles, diving into leadership workshops led by Serina Allison, and developing our outdoor education skills, such as kayaking, paddle boarding, high ropes, rock climbing, and the terrifying Leap of Faith!

Our girls will be creating an Action Plan, pulling from their experiences this week, aiming to plan some outreach project that aligns with our ocean literacy principles. Some examples of activities include shoreline cleanups, community gardens, recycling programs, upcycling activities, ocean trivia night, and the list goes on and on!

These girls are so inspiring, and I couldn't be more grateful to have the opportunity to partake in this life-changing experience. Looking around the room, all I see are Ocean Champions.

Check out the gallery to follow us on some of the activities we've been getting up to!


Youth Leaders are Keeping Our Shorelines Clean!

Posted by Nicole on July 13th, 2017

Our first team of Youth Environmental Leaders organized their own shoreline clean-up this week and took all of our AquaCampers with them!
We are proud to report that the youth and their camper teams picked up 6lbs of garbage in 1 hour at Devonian Harbour, including a loaf of bread, a blanket, and the stand of a podium....weird!



Youth get innovative at WILD Outside

Posted by Nicole on June 1st, 2017

Twenty amazing youth joined us at YMCA Camp Elphinstone for WILD Outside. Participants developed their team work, communication and problem solving through low ropes initiatives, games and a voyageur canoe paddle! By then end of their program they created 5 different projects to address environmental concerns they have in their local communities.
These projects include:

  1. Building a bee sanctuary
  2. Leading an energy audit
  3. Up cycling t-shirts into no-sew tote bags
  4. Organizing a pop up thrift shop
  5. Hosting an environmental fair at their school

I am looking forward to seeing these projects put into action!

To check out photos from the weekend head to our gallery.

Happy Camping,

Nicole


Thank you for great weekend!

Posted by Nicole on March 20th, 2017

Thank you to each and every one of you for your participation in our Ocean Education Camp at the Tribune Bay Outdoor Education Centre. I truly enjoyed connecting with each of you and seeing the creative ideas you were able to develop in such a short weekend. The herring spawn at Helliwell is definitely on my list of "most memorable encounters with wildlife"! Make sure to check out the gallery as I will be uploading the photos from the weekend. Cheers, Nicole.


UNA-C Green Corps Youth Retreat

Posted by Nicole on

This past weekend youth from the UNA-C Green Corps program joined us at the Tribune Bay Outdoor Education Centre on Hornby Island.
We had an amazing weekend networking, connecting with nature and discussing ocean literacy and the UN sustainable development goals.
Stay in touch! We can't wait to see where your new connections take you!